A Partial Conversion?

Reflections on the 11th chapter of Luke’s gospel from D.A. Carson in For the Love of God

One of the most striking pictures of what might be called a “partial conversion” is found in Luke 11:24-26.  Jesus teaches that when an evil spirit comes out of someone, it “goes through arid places seeking rest and does not find it”–apparently looking for some new person in whom to take up residence.  Then the spirit contemplates returning to its previous abode.  A brief investigation finds the former residence surprisingly vacant.  The spirit rounds up seven cronies who are even more vile, “and they go in and live there.  And the final condition of that man is worse than the first.”

Apparently the man who has been exorcised of the evil spirit never replaced that spirit with anything else.  The Holy Spirit did not take up residence in his life; the man simply remained vacant, as it were.

There are three lessons to learn.

First, “partial conversions” are all too common.  A person gets partially cleaned up.  He or she is drawn close enough to the Gospel and to the people of God that there is some sort of turning away from godlessness, a preliminary infatuation with holiness, an attraction toward righteousness.  But like the person represented by rocky soil in the parable of the sower and the soils (Luke 8:4-15), this person may initially seem to be the best of the crop, and yet not endure.  There has never been the kind of conversion that spells the takeover of an individual by the living God, a reorientation tied to genuine repentance and enduring faith.

The second lesson follows:  a little Gospel is a dangerous thing.  It gets people to think well of themselves, to sigh with relief that the worst evils have been dissipated, to enjoy a nice sense of belonging.  But if a person is not truly justified, regenerated, and transferred from the kingdom of darkness and into the kingdom of God’s dear Son, the dollop of religion may serve as little more than an inoculation against the real thing.

The third lesson is inferential.  This passage is thematically tied to another large strand of Scripture.  Evil cannot simply be opposed–that is, it is never enough simply to fight evil, to cast out a demon.  Evil must be replaced by good, the evil spirit by the Holy Spirit.  We must “overcome evil with good” (Romans 12:21).  For instance, it is difficult to overcome bitterness against someone by simply resolving to stop being bitter; one must replace bitterness by genuine forgiveness and love for that person.  It is difficult to overcome greed by simply resolving not to be quite so materialistic; one must fasten one’s affections on better treasure (cf. Luke 12:13-21) and learn to be wonderfully and self-sacrificially generous.  Overcome evil with good.

Mike.  Out.

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